Reusable Bags Help Businesses

Reusable bags help businesses stay competitive and connect with consumers.  Put your logo on our bags, and try the 4 tips below to improve your bag program.

A great bag program can reduce expenses, show customers you care, and help the environment with a great bag program.

Plastic bags cost retailers an estimated $4 billion annually.  Paper bags are even costlier.  Increasingly, everyone from grocery stores to retail shops are going reusable to reduce expenses and connect with consumers.

A well designed reusable bag strategy is an important part of staying competitive.  Use bags to boost profits by reducing expenses and to keep your store in consumers’ minds long after their purchase.  The following 4 tips can help you get your customers to participate.

1. Train cashiers to offer an eco-bag and put bags near the check-out stand.

Cashiers connect with each and every one of your customers and guide your customers to a better check out experience. Instead of automatically bagging goods in plastic bags, try having them ask: would you like an eco-bag today? A little encouragement can go a long way.  Bags displayed right at check out are more relevant than bags placed near the door, and will sell better right where your customers need them.

2. Offer bags that appeal to green customers.

Research shows that consumers are motivated to purchase a bag to help the environment. Adding an environmental message, icon, or using green for bag fabric or imprint helps consumers identify with the message of the bag.

3. Keep your item fresh.

Consider new color or design when you reorder. Ordering a once or twice a year will allow you to catch consumers’ eyes with a new product. Think about a forest green for the holidays. Bright greens and blues favorites for summer.  You might  even consider pink bags in October and tie in with a breast cancer awareness group.  Be sure to order ahead!  Lead times are typically 10-12 weeks.

4. Offer a Choice

Offer more than one color bag or more than one style. A consumer who sees one bag thinks: Do I want a bag? But seeing an attractive display of bags, a consumer is likely to think: which bag do I want? Choice engages attention and offers something for everyone.

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